Monday, November 2, 2009

Recipes for Week 2

Hello everyone! Hope your November is off to a great start - mine certainly is, especially after gaining an extra hour yesterday ("free" time is always much appreciated by this farmer)!

At long last, here are a few recipes to help inspire your cooking of what may or may not remain of week 2's veggies. I've got quite the stock pile of recipes to post over the next few weeks, so brace yourselves (you would be shocked, and possibly even apalled, at how much time I can spend reading through cookbooks and browsing recipes once I get going)! Happy times in the kitchen and at the table for all!
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SPINACH SALAD DRESSING

(from one of the "Best of Bridge" series cookbooks. I don't think I've known anyone who hasn't loved this salad when they've had it. And you can cut back on the sugar a bit if you'd like and it's really almost as good!)
1/3 c sugar
½ c sunflower oil
¼ c white vinegar
2 Tbsp poppy seeds
¼ tsp paprika
½ tsp Worcestershire sauce
1 ½ tsp finely minced onion
Combine all dressing ingredients together and shake well. Adjust seasoning to taste. Serve over fresh, tender spinach leaves.
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PARSNIP AND PEAMEAL CHOWDER
(from the Autumn 2009 “Food and Drink” magazine)

Although I have yet to make this soup, it looks pretty yummy. But if you need a break from soup, try roasting parsnips alongside of carrots, tossed lightly with melted butter, olive oil, sea salt, freshly ground pepper and some finely grated fresh ginger…also yum! Or, if you need more soup, look up the recipe for Winter Warmer soup posted here.
“A chowder is any kind of chunky soup, not necessarily fish-based. Parsnips are an underrated vegetable with a rich, sweet taste but you could substitute carrots or turnips if desired…”

1 Tbsp each vegetable oil and butter
2 oz peameal bacon, diced
1 cup (or 1 large) onion, diced
1 or 2 medium to large potatoes, diced
2 cups parsnips, peeled and diced
4 cups good chicken or vegetable stock
½ Tbsp chopped fresh thyme
Pinch cayenne
½ cup cream or whole milk
¼ cup chopped fresh parsley
¾ tsp paprika

Heat the oil and butter in a soup pot over medium heat. Add bacon and fry for 2 minutes or until any fat has rendered. Add onions and sauté until softened, about 3 minutes. Add potatoes and parsnips and continue to cook for 1 minute, stirring well to combine.

Pour in stock and season with thyme and cayenne. Bring to a boil, lower heat and simmer, covered, for 20 minutes or until vegetables are tender. Add cream (or milk) and parsley and simmer gently for 5 minutes. Serve garnished with a sprinkle of paprika.
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BUTTERNUT VEGETABLE SOUP

(from AllRecipes.com, and recommended by a CSA member-family who made and enjoyed it last week!)
"A thick, creamy butternut and bean soup is loaded with colorful, tasty vegetables - potatoes, onion, carrots, and kale. Serve with crusty bread."

2 Tbsp olive oil
2 Tbsp butter
1 cup finely diced onion
2 tsp minced garlic
4 large carrots, thinly sliced
2 cups peeled and cubed butternut squash
8-12 cups vegetable or chicken broth (depending on how thick/thin you'd like your soup)
2 potatoes, cubed
1/2 teaspoon dried thyme (or substitute a few fresh thyme sprigs!)
1 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon ground black pepper
4 cups finely chopped kale leaves
1 (16 ounce) can great Northern beans, rinsed and drained

Heat the oil and butter in a large pot or Dutch oven over medium heat. Stir in the onion and garlic; cook and stir until the onion has softened and turned translucent, about 5 minutes. Stir in the carrots and butternut squash; cook and stir until squash begins to brown, about 15 minutes.

Pour in the broth. Stir in the red potatoes, thyme, salt, and pepper, and bring to a boil. Reduce heat and simmer until vegetables are tender, about 45 minutes. Stir in the kale and great Northern beans, and simmer until the kale is tender, about 10 minutes.

Pour about 3 cups of the soup into a blender, filling the pitcher no more than halfway full (you may have to do this in two batches). Hold down the lid of the blender with a folded kitchen towel, and carefully start the blender, using a few quick pulses to get the soup moving before leaving it on to puree. Return the pureed portion of the soup to the soup pot, leaving the remaining soup chunky. Alternately, you can use an immersion blender and partially puree the soup right in the cooking pot.
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and finally...A NOTE ON ENDIVE
(from "Farmer John's Cookbook", p. 64)
"Endive and escarole both have a slightly bitter flavour, endive more so than escarole. These greens are perfect partners in a raw salad, especially if a sweeter green - such as red leaf lettuce - is mixed in. Herbs like parsley, fennel, mint and basil and even young and tender mesclun mix can add sweetness as well. Endive and escarole can also be cut into strips and added to soups. My favourite way to indulge in their romantic flavours is to use the younger inner leaves in a salad and have the larger, more bitter leaves in a cooked dish at the same meal. Cooking tends to bring a sweet flavour to the leaves. I also usually add roasted nuts and something sweet - like raisins, anise hyssop, or chopped sun-dried tomatoes - to any salad that contains anything slightly bitter..."

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